Taking Care of AADC Caregivers

Taking Care of AADC Caregivers

Caring for a child with physical and mental disabilities is a full-time job that can be stressful. Parents and caregivers can easily feel out of control and overwhelmed when caring for children with AADC deficiency, a rare developmental disorder that causes delayed mental and physical development.

Therefore, friends and family of caregivers need to be aware of caregiver stress and, if possible, find ways to help and support them. Here are some tips to help:

Learn about AADC deficiency

Starting a conversation about AADC can be difficult. People are often worried about what to say, and whether asking questions will offend. Most parents and caregivers do not mind answering questions, but finding out about the disease first can help make these conversations easier.

Read more about AADC deficiency on our website, AADC News, where we frequently post news, information, and research advancements about the disorder.

Keep in touch

Caregivers often feel isolated, so friends and family members should reach out to them, even if it’s to meet for coffee.

Offer to help

Caring for children with special needs can be difficult. Offer to help, even if it’s something small, such as bringing in mail or posting a letter. Taking over a meal can also be helpful.

Watch for signs of depression

Caregivers are often at a higher risk of depression than others, so be aware of the warning signs, and help caregivers get the resources they need.

Be understanding

Caregivers are under a lot of stress. Try to be understanding of last-minute changes in plans.

 

Last updated: August 15, 2019

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AADC News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Emily holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Iowa and is currently a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She graduated with a Masters in Chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology and holds a Bachelors in Biology and Chemistry from the University of Central Arkansas. Emily is passionate about science communication, and, in her free time, writes and illustrates children’s stories.
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Özge has a MSc. in Molecular Genetics from the University of Leicester and a PhD in Developmental Biology from Queen Mary University of London. She worked as a Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Leicester for six years in the field of Behavioural Neurology before moving into science communication. She worked as the Research Communication Officer at a London based charity for almost two years.
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Emily holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Iowa and is currently a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She graduated with a Masters in Chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology and holds a Bachelors in Biology and Chemistry from the University of Central Arkansas. Emily is passionate about science communication, and, in her free time, writes and illustrates children’s stories.
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